Tag Archives: J.K. Rowling

Magical Backstory from the Bard Named Beedle

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This is an enchanting volume to complement the “Harry Potter” series; it fleshes out some of the wizarding children’s myths mentioned in the original books.  I especially enjoyed how Rowling kept in the tradition of the other companion books, and “The Tales of Beedle the Bard” are offered as wizarding publication, offered to the Muggle population as well.
The popular stories (among magical folk, at least) were originally composed by Beedle, and recently translated from Ancient Runes by Hermione Granger, one of Hogwarts’ finest.  Fortuitously, drafts of commentary about the tales written by Albus Dumbledore were found in the late headmaster’s office and have been included here for the benefit of less informed muggles such as myself.  His explanations were helpful in trying to understand the importance of the tales in the wizarding psyche, as well as the plausibility of the stories in the real world of magic.
These tales are a great addition to the “Harry Potter” series and will be a welcome excursion into the wizarding world for any Harry fans.

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Who’s That Grown-Up Reading a Picture Book?

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Picture books, fantasy novels, and Dr. Seuss all day long.  After my first week on the job as a page in the Children’s department, I’ve noticed that my daily grind affords me the opportunity to handle hundreds of Children’s books every day and grab anything that interests me.  Now that I’m planning to become a librarian, it’s important for me to become more familiar with different books and information sources.  Since I’m considering entering into the world of Children’s librarianship, every kiddie book I read is a step closer to professional excellence….or at least a chance to relive happy literary memories of my childhood.

Yesterday, I noticed the intriguing title How Pizza Came To Queens by Dayal Kaur Khalsa.  After a five minute battle with the self-service checkout computer,  I took it home and read the picture book over lunch.  The story was adorable, and made me feel like a little kid again.  I was rapt anxiety, faced with a New York where pizza did not [yet] exist.  Thanks to the curiosity and assistance of four young girls and the wisdom and generosity of Mrs. Pellegrino, pizza is now a popular lunch standby in our great borough of Queens.

Today, I found The Red Thread by Grace Lin, a touching fairy tale that explains the bond of love between adopted children and their adoptive parents.   Ms. Lin dedicated the book “to all children adopted, the parents who loved them but could not keep them, and the parents who traveled far to find them.”  She writes, “There is an ancient Chinese belief that an invisible, unbreakable red thread connects all those who are destined to be together.”  Isn’t this true?  We’re all con This story can help to show children how important they are to their parents and how very much they are loved, no matter where they came from.

So, as I continue working in the Children’s department, I’ll be on the lookout for literature that either seems new and interesting, or that played a part in my own childhood.   Recommendations will be gladly accepted!  Next on the menu: The Tales of Beedle the Bard by J.K. Rowling.

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