Tag Archives: YA Literature

“The Simpsons” Meets YA Lit

The Simpsons, Season 23: Episode 6: “The Book Job”
(Watch it temporarily on Hulu here)

In this spoof of the Ocean’s Eleven franchise, Homer, Bart, and a gang of Springfieldians plot to “gang-write” the next tween fantasy publishing sensation  so that they can strike it rich.  Featuring guest voices of Neil Gaiman and Andy Garcia, this episode layers laugh-out-loud YA lit references on top of the familiar heist setup from Hollywood.  In an all-too-real subplot, Lisa Simpson endeavors to write her own novel, but can’t get past the procrastination temptations of online word games and CD re-organization (NaNoWriMo much?)  This episode should be required viewing for anyone involved in YA lit who likes to laugh.  Two thumbs up!

Write your favorite moments in the combox below.

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Homer: (After finishing writing the book) I just hope we put in enough steampunk…whatever that is.

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Book Talk – The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

Mini Booktalk on The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton

I haven’t used this with teens yet, but feel free to use it in a library if you’d like.

Life isn’t easy on greasers, and greasers aren’t easy on life.  These teens throw punches at their friends for fun, and pull out switchblades and guns on their rivals, the rich kids in their town.  Ponyboy, yes that’s his real name, lives with his two older brothers, and the greaser life is all they know.

Late one night, a chance encounter with the rich kids will leave one rival dead, and two greaser friends on the run from the law.  Can Ponyboy handle the tough life, and can his brothers keep him safe?  To find out more about how these boys laugh at danger and live to tell the tale, read The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton.

Busy Busy Busy

Oh my! It’s been awhile since I last posted.  I’m sorry!  My summer class on children’s literature, along with the move to my new apartment, has kept me safely away from blogging for too long.

The fall semester just started, and I’m settling in nicely to my new place.  This semester, I’m taking three courses:  management of school library media centers,  resources for the school curriculum, and young adult literature (this one with a particularly prominent player in the field).

Even though I’ve just begun the semester, I feel like I’ve been doing a lot of teen reads of note recently:

-The Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins was phenomenal.
The Midnight Palace by Carlos Ruiz Zafon, author of my beloved Shadow of the Wind, was alright but largely disappointing.
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton, one of the new classics I somehow missed during adolescence.
Monster by Walter Dean Myers is shaping up to be the first audio book I’ve really enjoyed.  Most other audio books I’ve felt forced to finish, scarcely desiring to change the CD in my car.  This one, however, is most engaging.

For the YA Lit course, every week is dedicated to a different genre, and I get to choose the trade books I want to read from a list of a half dozen or so for each genre.  I like being able to choose what I like, especially in some genres that may have pronounced variation within them.  I plan to write miniature book talks for each, in order to remember what I liked best about them.  More to come soon….

Teens’ Top Ten 2010

The list of top ten teen fiction books was announced this month.  Here’s the link to promotional video material featuring WWE Diva Eve Torres.

Here’s the list:

  1. Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins
  2. City of Glass by Cassandra Clare
  3. Heist Society by Ally Carter
  4. Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater
  5. Hush, Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick
  6. Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl
  7. Along for the Ride by Sarah Dessen
  8. If I Stay by Gayle Forman
  9. Fire by Kristin Cashore
  10. Wintergirls by Laurie Halse Anderson

Can anyone make a personal recommendation of any of these from the list? I haven’t read any of these yet, and I’d like something to read after I finish Sharp North.