Tag Archives: YA

Busy Busy Busy

Oh my! It’s been awhile since I last posted.  I’m sorry!  My summer class on children’s literature, along with the move to my new apartment, has kept me safely away from blogging for too long.

The fall semester just started, and I’m settling in nicely to my new place.  This semester, I’m taking three courses:  management of school library media centers,  resources for the school curriculum, and young adult literature (this one with a particularly prominent player in the field).

Even though I’ve just begun the semester, I feel like I’ve been doing a lot of teen reads of note recently:

-The Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins was phenomenal.
The Midnight Palace by Carlos Ruiz Zafon, author of my beloved Shadow of the Wind, was alright but largely disappointing.
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton, one of the new classics I somehow missed during adolescence.
Monster by Walter Dean Myers is shaping up to be the first audio book I’ve really enjoyed.  Most other audio books I’ve felt forced to finish, scarcely desiring to change the CD in my car.  This one, however, is most engaging.

For the YA Lit course, every week is dedicated to a different genre, and I get to choose the trade books I want to read from a list of a half dozen or so for each genre.  I like being able to choose what I like, especially in some genres that may have pronounced variation within them.  I plan to write miniature book talks for each, in order to remember what I liked best about them.  More to come soon….

Teens’ Top Ten 2010

The list of top ten teen fiction books was announced this month.  Here’s the link to promotional video material featuring WWE Diva Eve Torres.

Here’s the list:

  1. Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins
  2. City of Glass by Cassandra Clare
  3. Heist Society by Ally Carter
  4. Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater
  5. Hush, Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick
  6. Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl
  7. Along for the Ride by Sarah Dessen
  8. If I Stay by Gayle Forman
  9. Fire by Kristin Cashore
  10. Wintergirls by Laurie Halse Anderson

Can anyone make a personal recommendation of any of these from the list? I haven’t read any of these yet, and I’d like something to read after I finish Sharp North.

A Quiet Night at the Library

Right now, our library seems to be in the very middle of a multi-week lull in the action in the Children’s Room. The Make a Splash summer reading club ended nearly two weeks ago, but there is still a week left before procrastination-happy parents come in for last-minute summer reading books requested by the schools.

I normally work only 1pm-5pm on Fridays, but I volunteered for extra hours (and extra $), so I worked until 9pm.  From 5-9 I was on duty in the Young Adult/teen room.  It was the slowest day I’ve experienced, and the lack of teens was probably compounded by the fact that the weather outside was lovely.  During my four hours in the teen room, I probably helped only 5 teens and one elderly gentleman – much fewer than usual.

Luckily, I’d been given some projects to work on by my superiors and the other librarians.  Tonight was perfect for doing computer-heavy, involved tasks.  Here’s a sample of the few projects I’ve been doing:

1. Princess Book List.  In the Children’s Room, we’ll often get parents of preschool girls asking for princess books.  Inevitably, this happens while all of the librarians are busy with other patrons, so the princess patrons simply get referred to the Disney section.  Well, my superiors (and I) agree that it would be ideal to encourage non-Disney books, and make them easily available for the little girls that like everything to be a combination of pink, purple, and sparkly.  I finished the list today, and it should appear on the SHPL webpage next week.

2. Summer Book Weeding. This is my first assignment of this sort.  For those of you who aren’t familiar with library lingo, “weeding” is the process of assessing the frequency of use of materials in order to give/throw away anything that doesn’t earn its place on the shelf.   Today, I started the first round of weeding of the Summer Story books, just going through ones that have been on the front display shelf.  So far, it seems that less than 1/5 of the books are going into the tentative “weed” pile.

3. Journal Hunting. One of the full-time librarians got handed down an assignment from the boss, and she handed it down to me.  I started going through the School Library Journal, checking to make sure that our library has copies of all the most highly featured materials in the journal.  So far, I’ve found that we already have all but a few of the books that appear in the featured lists (this one happened to be about picture books that reinforce mathematical concepts).

Although these three projects are business-as-usual for seasoned librarians, they are all new tasks for me.  I’m excited to learn new procedures and develop familiarity with all aspects of the profession.  Additionally, I may also soon begin re-cataloging all of the audio CD collection in the Children’s Room.  We shall see….and don’t forget to enjoy the extra “quiet time” at the library in the August slow season.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

“Sync YA Literature Into Your Earphones”

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Thanks to my friend and fellow library professional, Christy Hartigan, I happened upon this great site supporting young adult (YA) literature.  Sync seeks to encourage young adults (ages 13+) to listen to audiobook versions of both contemporary and classic titles in YA lit.

According to the Sync homepage:

What is SYNC?

• SYNC is an online community that seeks to build the audience for audiobooks among readers 13 and up.

• Each week, SYNC will give away 2 FREE downloads–a popular Young Adult title paired with a Classic title that appears on Summer Reading lists–starting July 1 through September 1, 2010.

• SYNC is hosted by Audiobook Community, a new social networking site for the discovery of audiobooks.

• Listeners can choose to join a conversation about these titles with authors, narrators, publishers, librarians, and other listeners. (Listeners are not required to join Audiobook Community to follow the conversation on SYNC nor to download FREE titles from SYNC.)

In addition to the free weekly downloads, they offer great freebie downloads for librarians & educators: bookmarks, posters, newsletters, and more.  So download this week’s free audiobook and enjoy the YA audiobook community.  Tell me what you think of this recommendation in the comments section – anyone try out Sync?

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine